Panthera Wildlife Monitoring in Belize

Bocawina Rainforest Resort & Adventures are proud to sponsor Panthera Belize on their monitoring program in Mayflower Bocawina National Park.

Here are some amazing shots found on their camera traps throughout the park. Just amazing footage. We feel very fortunate to be amongst such amazing company as these fantastic cats.

Jaguar in Mayflower Bocawina Park

Ocelot in Mayflower Bocawina Park

Puma in Mayflower Bocawina Park

Here is a link to a presentation that Panthera gave to our guests after the recent monitoring sessions:

Jaguar in Mayflower Bocawina Park

About Panthera Belize

Panthera Belize is an NGO dedicated to the conservation of the wild cats of Belize, and in particular jaguars. Jaguar populations are in decline throughout their range due to deforestation, conflict with livestock farmers, an illegal wildlife trade for their teeth and skins, and competition with humans for wild prey. Our program is working to ensure the viability of jaguar populations in Belize through direct conservation action and research.

We monitor jaguars throughout the country, work with farmers and local communities to reduce human-wildlife conflict, work with hunters to assure sustainable harvest of Belizean game species, and work to ensure jaguars can pass through important unprotected landscapes as corridors to connect populations; part of Panthera’s range wide jaguar corridor initiative. Jaguars are top predators and to assure their survival, we are working on conservation measures and monitoring efforts of all wildlife as their prey base.

Through use of motion activated camera traps and GPS collars we are monitoring the health of jaguar populations across Belize. Vital to our work is collaborations with NGOs, corporations, and local communities, whose willingness to partner with us means we can create a truly national network of jaguar monitoring and management, unrivalled by any other country.

This national monitoring network is allowing us to assess the health of wildlife populations, and the functionality of Belize’s jaguar corridors, which are essential for maintaining genetic connectivity and ensuring the viability of jaguar populations through their range from the Northern tip of the Sonora desert in Mexico, to the Southern tip in Iguazu National park in Northern Argentina.